March 11, 2021

Liberty Culture and Effective Communication | Rhachel Toombs

"How to Help Fish See Water"

FULL EPISODE:

ABOUT RHACHEL

Today on BEST MEDICINE I'm speaking with an organizer for the national group "America's Future Foundation." (NOTE: She's speaking today representing herself, not the organization, but her work is discussed.)

Rhachel got her start in organizing by working in the church, but has since gone on to help various causes in the Liberty movement.

Her organization, AFF is the "culture and lifestyle" branch of the Liberty movement.

On this episode we discussed how institutions can be infiltrated by activists (and how they have been), national policy on Healthcare, Rhachel's favorite books to learn about Libertarian political philosophy, the number one communication trick Jesus, Karl Marx and your doctor use to influence and persuade.

EMPATHY, COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE

The world of medicine is a bit like the world of political activism.

Activists try to behave and communicate in a way that promotes others to adopt their solutions to a broken system.

Doctors, coaches, trainers, therapists, etc. are the same.

We have to communicate that our treatments are worth your time to adopt because it'll fix the broken system of your life.

There are a lot of steps to the equation. You have recognize there is a problem.

Then identify exactly what the problem is. Then identify where it's come from.

Then you have to understand what a functional system without the problem would look like. Then you need to identify a solution to bring you from the problematic state to a functional state.

Then after you do all that, you still have to use your empathy and communication to bring that solution to the people who need it, persuade them to use it, and help them follow through.

Doctors and Activists often fall prey to the same problems.

"Well, *I* know I'm right because I've studied this thoroughly. You should listen to me because I'm really smart!" 

"I *told* them they needed to do XYZ and they agreed. It's not my fault if they don't follow through."

"We were taught the solution to A is always B, I don't need to do any research on this because this is settled science."

If you're programming robots to work in a factory, these might be great mindsets. If you're hoping to persuade people to change their behavior then they're the worst possible beliefs to have.

I've mentioned in our previous episode with KC Craichy that doctors are taught about nutrition for MAYBE a day or two in the entire multi-year medical school program.

Doctors got behind the god-awful food pyramid for the longest time.

Does that seem like a coincidence? Doctors were "certified" in their knowledge of human health by an organization that didn't teach them about nutrition - then lo-and-behold they tell people to eat 8 servings of bread a day and the country dives into an obesity epidemic.

There are so many idiots in lab coats, snake oil salesman, and corporate mouthpieces with a Ph D running around in our media landscape that it's hard for people to know who to trust and what to believe.

So when a patient comes to see me, I *refuse* to be an empty shell in the shape of a doctor selling them pills and sending them on their way.

I instead aim to be a real human being. Every single time.

What does that look like? 

Well if someone is coming in and saying they are having XYZ symptoms, I don't just run down my memorized checklist of diseases to diagnose them with so they can get a pill from the pharmacy.

I keep that information on the ready, but I also dive deeper. I ask them about their life. I try to learn about who they are.

Sometimes by digging deeper I discover some critical information that leads me to change my recommendation. And in any case, by learning about the patient I am demonstrating that I care about them.

Once I learn about the patient and demonstrate I care about who they are - I can then use THEIR own circumstances to communicate on THEIR terms.

Have you ever felt confused when a doctor told you something? That's because they're speaking in a medical discourse that's pure gibberish to most people.

When explaining someone's medical problem and my advice for fixing it, I don't explain it the way I learned in medical school.

I explain it the way THEY would explain it to their co-workers at the plant, or to their sleepy wife before bed, or to their good friends at the bar.

Activists, Doctors and EVERY profession can learn from this.

If you can speak to people on THEIR terms from a place of real empathy then your message has a infinitely higher likelihood of landing.

TALKING ABOUT SYSTEMS WE LIVE IN

All too often it seems like we participate in systems that are supposed to work FOR us, but really they work ON us.

These systems are so all-encompassing and complex that learning and speaking about them can be incredibly difficult.

Since they're also so important to everyday life, they tend to embed themselves in our emotions and sense of self.

For example, I am a Doctor. I work in the medical system. I certainly don't approve of everything the medical system does.

Many activists point out the flaws in the medical system (for example, the Intactivists who are against genital mutilation that I have featured on this show), and if I were immature or unindividuated I wouldn't be able to hear those critiques.

What I would instead hear is "Your profession is part of an evil system and therefor you are irredeemable." 

It is said that real power never lowers it's influence, it only hides it better.

There are systems that are so powerful and obscure that even identifying the source of their power can be difficult, let alone discussing these dynamics with others.

In this episode, Rhachel and I discuss the spread of Marxism through the institutions of the United States of America.

This is a process called the "Long March Through the Institutions" which was written about by Marxist writer Antonio Gramsci in his "Prison Notebooks" long before any of us were alive.

The basic strategy was to get some radical marxists academics into the universities. Through this mechanism marxists would become certified to work in every major profession.

From there they could take apolitical careers and force out other people while filling those institutions with other Marxists.

Eventually their influence would be so great and so distributed that nobody would be able to notice.

Then the professional, academic and media classes would influence above them (politicians and corporate executives) as well as below them (citizens).

Most people do not believe this happened. Among people who DO believe it happened, few would argue it's effectiveness be they Marxists or not.

Talking about this dynamic is inherently difficult because if you talk about it before it works (before the 1960s) then it's a "McCarthyist Red Scare" but if you talk about it after it's worked you are now "a conspiracy nut who is challenging the progress created by democracy." 

One of my goals with this podcast is to speak to as many people as possible about "What happened to America?"

I know that question is open ended. But by asking that question to as many people as possible I hope to learn how people with terrific communication ability and fascinating careers perceive (or don't perceive) the systems they inhabit.

Systems effect all of our minds differently and it's only through understanding as many points of view on those systems as possible that one can gain an ability to communicate to others about that system.

I am a doctor who will speak openly about the flaws in the medical system, and I've taken steps to create change in that system.

The medical industry makes billions and billions a year off of unjustifiably inflated prices.

"Doctors" are the bait to get patients in the door so the medical system (insurance, pharma/biotech companies, and hospitals) can sell product.

We fight a lot in America about whether the government or private corporations should correct this issue.

From my vantage point, both of those parties are equally complicit in the medical system. It benefits the power holders - be they private or public - that we keep debating about who should fix the problem. Why?

Because as long as we're debating WHO should fix an issue, it's implied that WE are not the ones to fix it.

I find that untenable and created a solution myself.

That's why every American REGARDLESS OF INSURANCE STATUS is welcome at the new Wellspring Clinic.

For $50 you may speak to a doctor for any reason and receive medical guidance. If you are unsatisfied with your service you will be entitled to an instant refund.

Be part of a solution - to your own health problems and to the problems in America --> wellspringcare.org/

March 11, 2021

Liberty Culture and Effective Communication | Rhachel Toombs

"How to Help Fish See Water"

FULL EPISODE:

ABOUT RHACHEL

Today on BEST MEDICINE I'm speaking with an organizer for the national group "America's Future Foundation." (NOTE: She's speaking today representing herself, not the organization, but her work is discussed.)

Rhachel got her start in organizing by working in the church, but has since gone on to help various causes in the Liberty movement.

Her organization, AFF is the "culture and lifestyle" branch of the Liberty movement.

On this episode we discussed how institutions can be infiltrated by activists (and how they have been), national policy on Healthcare, Rhachel's favorite books to learn about Libertarian political philosophy, the number one communication trick Jesus, Karl Marx and your doctor use to influence and persuade.

EMPATHY, COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE

The world of medicine is a bit like the world of political activism.

Activists try to behave and communicate in a way that promotes others to adopt their solutions to a broken system.

Doctors, coaches, trainers, therapists, etc. are the same.

We have to communicate that our treatments are worth your time to adopt because it'll fix the broken system of your life.

There are a lot of steps to the equation. You have recognize there is a problem.

Then identify exactly what the problem is. Then identify where it's come from.

Then you have to understand what a functional system without the problem would look like. Then you need to identify a solution to bring you from the problematic state to a functional state.

Then after you do all that, you still have to use your empathy and communication to bring that solution to the people who need it, persuade them to use it, and help them follow through.

Doctors and Activists often fall prey to the same problems.

"Well, *I* know I'm right because I've studied this thoroughly. You should listen to me because I'm really smart!" 

"I *told* them they needed to do XYZ and they agreed. It's not my fault if they don't follow through."

"We were taught the solution to A is always B, I don't need to do any research on this because this is settled science."

If you're programming robots to work in a factory, these might be great mindsets. If you're hoping to persuade people to change their behavior then they're the worst possible beliefs to have.

I've mentioned in our previous episode with KC Craichy that doctors are taught about nutrition for MAYBE a day or two in the entire multi-year medical school program.

Doctors got behind the god-awful food pyramid for the longest time.

Does that seem like a coincidence? Doctors were "certified" in their knowledge of human health by an organization that didn't teach them about nutrition - then lo-and-behold they tell people to eat 8 servings of bread a day and the country dives into an obesity epidemic.

There are so many idiots in lab coats, snake oil salesman, and corporate mouthpieces with a Ph D running around in our media landscape that it's hard for people to know who to trust and what to believe.

So when a patient comes to see me, I *refuse* to be an empty shell in the shape of a doctor selling them pills and sending them on their way.

I instead aim to be a real human being. Every single time.

What does that look like? 

Well if someone is coming in and saying they are having XYZ symptoms, I don't just run down my memorized checklist of diseases to diagnose them with so they can get a pill from the pharmacy.

I keep that information on the ready, but I also dive deeper. I ask them about their life. I try to learn about who they are.

Sometimes by digging deeper I discover some critical information that leads me to change my recommendation. And in any case, by learning about the patient I am demonstrating that I care about them.

Once I learn about the patient and demonstrate I care about who they are - I can then use THEIR own circumstances to communicate on THEIR terms.

Have you ever felt confused when a doctor told you something? That's because they're speaking in a medical discourse that's pure gibberish to most people.

When explaining someone's medical problem and my advice for fixing it, I don't explain it the way I learned in medical school.

I explain it the way THEY would explain it to their co-workers at the plant, or to their sleepy wife before bed, or to their good friends at the bar.

Activists, Doctors and EVERY profession can learn from this.

If you can speak to people on THEIR terms from a place of real empathy then your message has a infinitely higher likelihood of landing.

TALKING ABOUT SYSTEMS WE LIVE IN

All too often it seems like we participate in systems that are supposed to work FOR us, but really they work ON us.

These systems are so all-encompassing and complex that learning and speaking about them can be incredibly difficult.

Since they're also so important to everyday life, they tend to embed themselves in our emotions and sense of self.

For example, I am a Doctor. I work in the medical system. I certainly don't approve of everything the medical system does.

Many activists point out the flaws in the medical system (for example, the Intactivists who are against genital mutilation that I have featured on this show), and if I were immature or unindividuated I wouldn't be able to hear those critiques.

What I would instead hear is "Your profession is part of an evil system and therefor you are irredeemable." 

It is said that real power never lowers it's influence, it only hides it better.

There are systems that are so powerful and obscure that even identifying the source of their power can be difficult, let alone discussing these dynamics with others.

In this episode, Rhachel and I discuss the spread of Marxism through the institutions of the United States of America.

This is a process called the "Long March Through the Institutions" which was written about by Marxist writer Antonio Gramsci in his "Prison Notebooks" long before any of us were alive.

The basic strategy was to get some radical marxists academics into the universities. Through this mechanism marxists would become certified to work in every major profession.

From there they could take apolitical careers and force out other people while filling those institutions with other Marxists.

Eventually their influence would be so great and so distributed that nobody would be able to notice.

Then the professional, academic and media classes would influence above them (politicians and corporate executives) as well as below them (citizens).

Most people do not believe this happened. Among people who DO believe it happened, few would argue it's effectiveness be they Marxists or not.

Talking about this dynamic is inherently difficult because if you talk about it before it works (before the 1960s) then it's a "McCarthyist Red Scare" but if you talk about it after it's worked you are now "a conspiracy nut who is challenging the progress created by democracy." 

One of my goals with this podcast is to speak to as many people as possible about "What happened to America?"

I know that question is open ended. But by asking that question to as many people as possible I hope to learn how people with terrific communication ability and fascinating careers perceive (or don't perceive) the systems they inhabit.

Systems effect all of our minds differently and it's only through understanding as many points of view on those systems as possible that one can gain an ability to communicate to others about that system.

I am a doctor who will speak openly about the flaws in the medical system, and I've taken steps to create change in that system.

The medical industry makes billions and billions a year off of unjustifiably inflated prices.

"Doctors" are the bait to get patients in the door so the medical system (insurance, pharma/biotech companies, and hospitals) can sell product.

We fight a lot in America about whether the government or private corporations should correct this issue.

From my vantage point, both of those parties are equally complicit in the medical system. It benefits the power holders - be they private or public - that we keep debating about who should fix the problem. Why?

Because as long as we're debating WHO should fix an issue, it's implied that WE are not the ones to fix it.

I find that untenable and created a solution myself.

That's why every American REGARDLESS OF INSURANCE STATUS is welcome at the new Wellspring Clinic.

For $50 you may speak to a doctor for any reason and receive medical guidance. If you are unsatisfied with your service you will be entitled to an instant refund.

Be part of a solution - to your own health problems and to the problems in America --> wellspringcare.org/