April 19, 2021

Gratitude, Overcoming Family Baggage, and Becoming Heart Powered | David Gold

Lawyer, Entrepreneur and Success Coach David Gold joins us to discuss the mindsets he uses to help high achievers transcend the baggage of their lineage and achieve success

LISTEN --> https://open.spotify.com/show/4FUqTAFwMmXNORnRUg2CPu

ABOUT DAVE GOLD

Dave Gold is a former attorney turned business consultant. He is the founder of Heart Powered Productions. His mission is to help figurative Lions with torn in their paw. He helps people with a mission do the inner work to succeed with love and grace. Dave and I discuss:

- Why gratitude is the "coin of the realm" when it comes to authenticity

- Mindset shifts to realize why everything is good

- Dave's unique journey from lawyer to spiritual consultant

- Mental Health benefits of gratitude and kindness

You can find Dave's work at heartpoweredproductions.com

Gratitude Is The Path

Today I'd like to talk about Gratitude. Gratitude is a weapon against suffering, your own weakness, and against your enemies. Here's how:

First we must explore the concept of framing. Frame is the way we choose to view facts, or supposed facts.

It is a fact that 550,000 people have died of Coronavirus in the USA (as of writing, April 2021) Here are two competing frames:

1. 550,000 is too many and we must lockdown to prevent more

2. Our strategy of lockdown has not prevented 550,000 deaths, and has created deaths of despair. We should change our response.

These two frames come from the same fact.

As you can see, the left and right are living in two different realities on the issue of COVID. This is the power of frame.

Framing your world controls the world your brain thinks it's living in.

If this frame is shared by others it might as well be objective reality itself.

This can be very practical in your life. There is a frame you can adopt which is strategic, pleasurable, and authentic all at once.

That frame is called gratitude.

My guest on the podcast this week, Dave Gold, studied at a monastery growing up.

At the monastery, gratitude was the "coin of the realm" when it came to measuring authenticity. If a student had a life problem, they could choose two responses:

  1. Resistance
  2. Gratitude

Those who were resentful and resisted their problem made it worse - like struggling in a quick sand pit.

The teachers could not help these students deal with the problem very well as they were attached to the suffering.

Students who chose to be grateful for their problem oftentimes resolved the problem on the spot.

Those who still needed help were easily coached to a practical solution because they weren't married to suffering emotionally about a practical problem.

If you can be grateful for a problem and still recognize it needs solving, then go about asking for the help to solve it - then you know your experiences are real, not imagined, and that your response is an authentic one.

"But how can this be?"

We must draw this worldview from one principle. We have to axiomatically suppose everything that has happened is good, to some greater or lesser degree. Why?

If an event has unfolded there is no way to materially change the past.

Time travel is not real. To wish for things to be different is to wish for an objective truth to be false.

It is to wish we lived in a world where the laws of physics, society, biology, etc. were different so you could get some hypothetical outcome.

However, this is impossible. We have to assume wishing to live in a world that does not exist is a waste of time, and that we're better off NOT living in that universe.

Your options to respond to any event are apathy, resentment or gratitude. Apathy is an option that gets you nowhere. Discard.

Resentment is a poison that will make any problem worse. Discard.

Gratitude will at least make you feel better and regain your strength. However there are other benefits to gratitude.

When tragedy happens - as it's bound to - you must ask "in what way is this helping me? Why have I been blessed with this moment?"

Asking that question is an act of engaging with the Logos (articulated divine truth).

Asking that will prompt a response.

"Well, certainly I'm miserable my father has passed away. But now that they are gone, I am closer with the rest of my family in mourning. I feel a renewed dedication to achieve my goals because that would make my father proud."

"It's sure terrible I lost my job. I will struggle for a bit. But I feel a renewed vigor to 'eat what I kill,' pursue my unique vision and develop my skills so I can be 'un-fire-able' in my next career move. I now have the time to improve myself"

Tragedies don't happen every day, but bad things happen probably every hour of the day.

Boredom, delays, annoying people, unsettling sights and sounds, hunger, thirst, cravings. Be grateful for these moments.

Everyday I drive to work and I practice gratitude for the stoplights that plague everyone else's commute. Sure, they're making me late to work.

But they're reminding me how precious my time is. I get to look around a little bit more. I can finish an extra song in my car.

I get to be reminded at how amazingly lucky we are to live in a country with functioning systems such as traffic (though I suppose sometimes it seems they are hardly functioning...)

How do you practice gratitude in your daily life?

April 19, 2021

Gratitude, Overcoming Family Baggage, and Becoming Heart Powered | David Gold

Lawyer, Entrepreneur and Success Coach David Gold joins us to discuss the mindsets he uses to help high achievers transcend the baggage of their lineage and achieve success

LISTEN --> https://open.spotify.com/show/4FUqTAFwMmXNORnRUg2CPu

ABOUT DAVE GOLD

Dave Gold is a former attorney turned business consultant. He is the founder of Heart Powered Productions. His mission is to help figurative Lions with torn in their paw. He helps people with a mission do the inner work to succeed with love and grace. Dave and I discuss:

- Why gratitude is the "coin of the realm" when it comes to authenticity

- Mindset shifts to realize why everything is good

- Dave's unique journey from lawyer to spiritual consultant

- Mental Health benefits of gratitude and kindness

You can find Dave's work at heartpoweredproductions.com

Gratitude Is The Path

Today I'd like to talk about Gratitude. Gratitude is a weapon against suffering, your own weakness, and against your enemies. Here's how:

First we must explore the concept of framing. Frame is the way we choose to view facts, or supposed facts.

It is a fact that 550,000 people have died of Coronavirus in the USA (as of writing, April 2021) Here are two competing frames:

1. 550,000 is too many and we must lockdown to prevent more

2. Our strategy of lockdown has not prevented 550,000 deaths, and has created deaths of despair. We should change our response.

These two frames come from the same fact.

As you can see, the left and right are living in two different realities on the issue of COVID. This is the power of frame.

Framing your world controls the world your brain thinks it's living in.

If this frame is shared by others it might as well be objective reality itself.

This can be very practical in your life. There is a frame you can adopt which is strategic, pleasurable, and authentic all at once.

That frame is called gratitude.

My guest on the podcast this week, Dave Gold, studied at a monastery growing up.

At the monastery, gratitude was the "coin of the realm" when it came to measuring authenticity. If a student had a life problem, they could choose two responses:

  1. Resistance
  2. Gratitude

Those who were resentful and resisted their problem made it worse - like struggling in a quick sand pit.

The teachers could not help these students deal with the problem very well as they were attached to the suffering.

Students who chose to be grateful for their problem oftentimes resolved the problem on the spot.

Those who still needed help were easily coached to a practical solution because they weren't married to suffering emotionally about a practical problem.

If you can be grateful for a problem and still recognize it needs solving, then go about asking for the help to solve it - then you know your experiences are real, not imagined, and that your response is an authentic one.

"But how can this be?"

We must draw this worldview from one principle. We have to axiomatically suppose everything that has happened is good, to some greater or lesser degree. Why?

If an event has unfolded there is no way to materially change the past.

Time travel is not real. To wish for things to be different is to wish for an objective truth to be false.

It is to wish we lived in a world where the laws of physics, society, biology, etc. were different so you could get some hypothetical outcome.

However, this is impossible. We have to assume wishing to live in a world that does not exist is a waste of time, and that we're better off NOT living in that universe.

Your options to respond to any event are apathy, resentment or gratitude. Apathy is an option that gets you nowhere. Discard.

Resentment is a poison that will make any problem worse. Discard.

Gratitude will at least make you feel better and regain your strength. However there are other benefits to gratitude.

When tragedy happens - as it's bound to - you must ask "in what way is this helping me? Why have I been blessed with this moment?"

Asking that question is an act of engaging with the Logos (articulated divine truth).

Asking that will prompt a response.

"Well, certainly I'm miserable my father has passed away. But now that they are gone, I am closer with the rest of my family in mourning. I feel a renewed dedication to achieve my goals because that would make my father proud."

"It's sure terrible I lost my job. I will struggle for a bit. But I feel a renewed vigor to 'eat what I kill,' pursue my unique vision and develop my skills so I can be 'un-fire-able' in my next career move. I now have the time to improve myself"

Tragedies don't happen every day, but bad things happen probably every hour of the day.

Boredom, delays, annoying people, unsettling sights and sounds, hunger, thirst, cravings. Be grateful for these moments.

Everyday I drive to work and I practice gratitude for the stoplights that plague everyone else's commute. Sure, they're making me late to work.

But they're reminding me how precious my time is. I get to look around a little bit more. I can finish an extra song in my car.

I get to be reminded at how amazingly lucky we are to live in a country with functioning systems such as traffic (though I suppose sometimes it seems they are hardly functioning...)

How do you practice gratitude in your daily life?